up!

bitchbetterhavemyhunny:

hissyhors:

dxindustriesinc:

sushinfood:

vvankinq:

this is fucked up. this fucked me up. the teachers fucked up by not showing us this fuck up. fuck.

dear god

i’m 28 and never knew this

WHAT

wh

so I just tried 27 and 15 and got 2 17 and 28 with my chart what do I do now

nevermind I got it but not any thanks to this post

(Source: yodiscrepo)

sugashane:

jaredwade:

The Historic Drop In Teen Births (via ThinkProgress)

Thanks abortion!

sugashane:

jaredwade:

The Historic Drop In Teen Births (via ThinkProgress)

Thanks abortion!

hissyhors:

dxindustriesinc:

sushinfood:

vvankinq:

this is fucked up. this fucked me up. the teachers fucked up by not showing us this fuck up. fuck.

dear god

i’m 28 and never knew this

WHAT

wh

so I just tried 27 and 15 and got 2 17 and 28 with my chart what do I do now

(Source: yodiscrepo, via itsseren)

Congress Proposes Law Banning Body Armor In The Land Of The Free →

antigovernmentextremist:

The purchasing of body armor would be punishable with up to 10 years in prison. I’m wondering what the statistics are of crimes being committed with body armor. Just the other day I saw someone live streaming from Ferguson using body armor to protect himself from live fire and police tear gas canisters and rubber bullets. This just seems like a really backward attempt to make people safer.

Police and Racism: The Core of the Problem

laliberty:

The apparent overarching narrative that has emerged from Ferguson  - aside from the media and politicians’ general defense of the heavily militarized police state - has been one about racial discrimination against black individuals by cops (and a justice system) who are predominantly white.

There is absolutely no denying a racial component to all of this. One need only look at how the war on drugs disproportionately affects black Americans, from stop-and-frisk policies in New York to imprisonment statistics nationwide, to see the underlying prejudices that permeate the system.

I worked on a “reality” show many years ago that followed around police. Because this show relied on access in order for it to exist, we had strict instructions to never let the cops look bad.

For my first (and only) episode, the producers voiced concerns about potentially interacting with non-English speakers as that posed a problem since the producers only spoke English. The cop looked right at the camera, smiled, and said: “Sorry, we won’t be pulling any white people over tonight.”

During his beat, he made 6 stops. He issued citations to four people (all on absolutely bogus charges) and arrested one person (also completely trumped up: predicated on a fabricated “anonymous witness,” which lead to an illegal search that found an old and clearly broken glass pipe hidden in the spare tire well in his trunk).

He also let one couple go with a warning. Of all the people, they were the only ones who had clearly violated the law (they were smoking, peaceably, in their car). They were also the only ones who weren’t black or hispanic.

The producers asked me to make the cop look credible and competent, and make the guy who was arrested say things he didn’t actually say by reconstructing various pieces of dialog. I quit that show the next day.

But with regards to the problem of institutionalized racism, the danger lies more in the institution than the racism. Without the institution - without the power, without the monopoly on the “legal” initiation of force - racism is but an ugly opinion

And while the cops may disproportionately target minorities, that doesn’t mean everyone else is safe - as the families of Kelly Thomas and too many others would tell you. No race or gender or age or person is ultimately safe when such force can be wielded.

I’ve long held with regards to corporatism that “so long as there are centers of power, those with means will aim to wield that power or work it in their favor. And there’s no greater power than the state’s monopoly on force.” It’s not a mystery that both politics and police attract the same type of power-hungry people, but government police provide the added incentive of actually being able to physically assault other people while suffering little to no consequences. So, again, it’s no wonder that the types of people who would be attracted to such violence and have a propensity for sociopathy would be attracted to a position that offers such power.

Racism itself is a collectivist idea, as it considers people as parts of a group instead of as individuals. Without the state empowering these collectivists, racists would not be protected from the natural costs and consequences of their behavior. 

It’s not black vs white or rich vs poor or red vs blue or young vs old; it’s the state vs us.

(via eltigrechico)

nyctaeus:

Olivia Locher - ‘I Fought The Law’
Photo series illustrating the most absurd laws still valid in America today

1. In Rhode Island it is illegal to wear transparent clothing

2. In Arizona you can not have more than two dildo’s in your house

3. In California nobody is allowed to ride a bicycle in a swimming pool

4. In Alabama it is illegal to have an ice cream cone in your back pocket at all times

5. In Tennessee hollow logs may not be sold

6. In Utah no one may walk down the street carrying a paper bag containing a violin

7. In Kansas, it’s illegal to serve wine in teacups

8. In Ohio, it’s illegal to disrobe in front of a mans portrait

9. In Kentucky it’s illegal to paint your lawn red

10. In Connecticut pickles must bounce to officially be considered pickles

(via bandteesanddcs)

eltigrechico:

How to end poverty? Just give out money.
Thomas Sowell says that Basic Economics teaches one to think “beyond stage one” but in this case I don’t even think they’ve thought as far as stage one.
Some people really think that all we have to do to solve problems in this world is just wish for them to be gone, hit the “that was easy” button, and then commence the self-congratulations.

eltigrechico:

How to end poverty? Just give out money.

Thomas Sowell says that Basic Economics teaches one to think “beyond stage one” but in this case I don’t even think they’ve thought as far as stage one.

Some people really think that all we have to do to solve problems in this world is just wish for them to be gone, hit the “that was easy” button, and then commence the self-congratulations.

(Source: belcanta)

cringepics:

weeabos.jpg


I thought this was the gorilla warfare navy seal pasta

cringepics:

weeabos.jpg

I thought this was the gorilla warfare navy seal pasta

(via whowasfone)

normcore-dad:

Shout out to Al Jazeera straight up showing a video of their reporters getting tear gassed during a live interview of the Ferguson police chief denying that they are tear gassing journalists.

(via whowasfone)